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tonz-o-funguy

does anyone "stress" there mushrooms?????????????????

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tonz-o-funguy

I was thinking about this...........

If psylocibin is produced as defensive mechanism and cactus produce mescaline as a defensive mechanism. To increase potency in cacti growing the cactus gets stressed prior to being harvested. Can anyone chime in and tell me how come we don't do the same? would this not insure higher potency? The bases of stems are a common place for bluing i guess it due to wind rocking the mushroom causing stress?  so maybe if a mushroom receives no stress it does not feel the need to produce active?

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Rezz

Who on earth told you mescaline and psylocibin are defensive mechanism? 

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tonz-o-funguy

heres the an exceert from the aricleand the link

"But our main question is, 'How did it evolve?'" Slot said. "What is the role of psilocybin in nature?"

To answer that question, the team had to look at what psilocybin does.

In humans, it causes hallucinations by suppressing a particular neurotransmitter. But in insects, suppression of this neurotransmitter has a different effect - it dampens appetite.

This makes a difference because the horizontal gene transfer of the gene cluster noted by the team seems to have occurred in environments with lots of insects, such as animal manure and rotten wood.

"We speculate that mushrooms evolved to be hallucinogenic because it lowered the chances of the fungi getting eaten by insects," Slot said.

"The psilocybin probably doesn't just poison predators or taste bad. These mushrooms are altering the insects' 'mind' - if they have minds - to meet their own needs."

How exactly the gene cluster transferred is a mystery, since horizontal gene transfer across mushrooms isn't common.

https://www.sciencealert.com/magic-mushrooms-psilocybin-evolved-deter-predators-horizontal-gene-transfer

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mushmouth

Producing psilocybin through evolution and producing psilocybin as they grow, are two very different things.

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tonz-o-funguy

i defintely read the cactus but here i didnt know acaria controllng ants, cordyoceps do the same.  plants especially smart plants with psycoactive chems/alkoloid contents. just some food for thought

16 minutes ago, tonz-o-funguy said:

We speculate that mushrooms evolved to be hallucinogenic because it lowered the chances of the fungi getting eaten by insects," Slot said

Herbivores, both large and small, use plants as food and actively chew them. Plants have developed a variety of strategies to discourage or kill attackers.

Mechanical Defenses

The first line of defense in plants is an intact and impenetrable barrier composed of bark and a waxy cuticle. Both protect plants against herbivores. Other adaptations against herbivores include hard shells, thorns (modified branches), and spines (modified leaves). They discourage animals by causing physical damage or by inducing rashes and allergic reactions. Some Acacia tree species have developed mutualistic relationships with ant colonies: they offer the ants shelter in their hollow thorns in exchange for the ants’ defense of the tree’s leaves.

 

https://courses.lumenlearning.com/boundless-biology/chapter/plant-defense-mechanisms/

https://www.shroomery.org/forums/showflat.php/Number/8316161

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