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Mush Zombie

Mushroom Sub-Strain Isolation

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Str0be

When you isolate a substrain like this, and you end up with a dish with nothing but linear rhizomorphic mycelium, is it generally always a fruitable strain? Or can you end up isolating a strain that doesn't even produce?

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Mush Zombie

When you isolate a substrain like this, and you end up with a dish with nothing but linear rhizomorphic mycelium, is it generally always a fruitable strain? Or can you end up isolating a strain that doesn't even produce?

Yes you can wind up isolating a substrain that does not have good fruiting potential, even if its rhizomorphic.Thats why its best to start the isolation process with a clone of a mushroom from a large cluster, if a high yielding sub-strain is what you are after.
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BEYOND2

thanks MZ ive been waitn for thread like this :boxxy:

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AL2O3

thanks for the post MZ. Great information

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Dozzer

Thank you MZ for posting this, it will help everyone new and old, and very easy to follow and understandPeace From The East**D**

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Str0be

A method I have been using and seems to do me justice is to induce fruiting on the plate itself. You will then see right away which sectors are good possible candidates before transfering just by the pin sets. Its a quick and effective way to get a preview of what you are possibly growing. :)MZ is right use big clusterspost-106-0-38599800-1329705241_thumb.jpgAnd you can get big flushespost-106-0-41798300-1329705365_thumb.jpgpost-106-0-88106800-1329705395_thumb.jpg

By inducing fruiting, you mean just putting your agar dishes in the same environment as you would to fruit? Basically just a room with a temp around 68 - 72?
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SquidHead

Yeah if you wait long enough they will automatically. Yes you can get them to pin by dropping temps slightly and giving them some light. They remain sealed though, until I am in front of a hood and doing transfers. My theory is if they can fruit abundantly on agar then they will do even better on a nutrient rich substrate.

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BEYOND2

damn that shits crazy!!!!!

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Neowulf

awesome i hope to start doing this with results from first grow

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OStricher

Good info and well presented.

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MrDouchebag

This couldn't have been more clear and easy to understand MZ. Thanks you!

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KICKASS

Posted ImageMush Zombie, on 19 February 2012 - 04:20 PM, said:

Yes you can wind up isolating a substrain that does not have good fruiting potential, even if its rhizomorphic.

Thats why its best to start the isolation process with a clone of a mushroom from a large cluster, if a high yielding sub-strain is what you are after.

So easy to understand. I repect the scientific guys alot! But have a hard time digesting what they are saying at a novice level, and for a quick turnaround.

And I respect you for cutting out and translating this into "laymens" terms.

Thank you! Thank you! Thank you!! :)

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OStricher

So the 2 lc's I just started from a single heavy rhizo is just that, a heavy rhizo myc. At this point it may be a poor producer with bad characteristics. Pretty much a 50/50 chance till I see the fruit from it. That makes sense on why a sample from a fruit with good characteristics would be preferred.

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Mr.Greenthumb

awesome tek MZ im all ready doing my research so I can do this myself!!

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SlimJim

If you are using the agar jars definately. I have done that many times, not purposefully, just being a slacker. They will pin if you just leave them out somewhere like you described.

Even PE! :)

post-1-0-00489500-1329756024_thumb.jpgpost-1-0-16487000-1329756031_thumb.jpg

Really great pictures and post!

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BrutalityIsLaw

Looks like it's time to get some agar going!

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Those Who Were

I got a mean rhizo growth of pe in an agar dish. my ape agar had little blue dicks that popped up in a cluster. got 4 lc's ready to make some reishi lc and ala lc. great write up MZ

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Austiclees

Dikaryotic Mycelium- www.iscid.org/encyclopedia/Dikaryotic_Cell

Link's not valid anymore. :(
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 Pseudonemesis

I never thought of using widemouth jars as petri dishes... What is your opinion on isolating directly on rye? I have seen very different types of growth from the same variety growing from the same batch of grains when growing from spore... I seem to remember reading back in the day that if you grow from a single spore it won't form carpophores until the mycelium trades genetics with another genetically different mycelium culture. Do you know the terms associated with this phenomenon?

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 Pseudonemesis

in an ms culture, this whole process occurs at the inoculation point. thousands of spores germinate as monokaryons. those monokaryons are not capable of producing fruits. they mate with another monokaryon. thus dikaryotic mycelium is formed, and this is your genetically different culture (AKA sub-strain). There will be several dikaryotic cultures in a single MS culture. The objective of this thread is to show how to isolate those cultures.

That's what I thought. Do you know what the process of their "genetics swap" is called?

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Mush Zombie

That's what I thought. Do you know what the process of their "genetics swap" is called?

i am not sure of the exact terminology. The only reason why I know this is because I read a few books showing the process in pictures and descriptions. One thing that is interesting, in an MS culture the dominant substrains (which usually resemble the parent of the spores) actually convert the weaker substrains into it's substrain, until there are only a handful of dominant substrains in the culture.
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